05 Oct 2019

CPR Certification Explained

Many people want to know what CPR is and who can get the certificate. The goal of this post is to provide you with enough information about CPR certification. Before we go into details, let us know in short what CPR--Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation, really is.

The heart ceases pumping blood when there is cardiac arrest. Ventricular fibrillation causes it, and the heart quivers when it happens. CPR is a process of delivering some blood to the heart. When the heart receives blood, the whole body keeps functioning. Gradually the heart resumes its normal function—which is known as defibrillation.

Now we will look at the history of CPR. The Paris Academy of Science recommended mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in 1740. This technique was used to assist drowning victims. But the official documentation of chest compression took place more than a century later, in 1891. Although CPR was initially developed for doctors, common people later showed interest in the technique.

Now CPR certification is mainly offered to doctors, chiropractors, licensed physical therapists, nurses and dentists. Teachers, camp counsellors, lifeguards also receive the training. If you are not in any of these professions, you should learn what it is so that you can act quickly when there is an emergency.

Local hospitals, even fire departments issue the certificate. There are many places which advertise that they offer training courses to earn your first aid and CPR certificate, take a look at their website and find the course which suits you. Starting somewhere local would likely be the best fit.

The levels of certification also vary a bit. There are community level classes that focus on teaching CPR, mainly performed on older children and adults. AED training is also a part of the course. They focus on helping heart attack victims by performing electronic defibrillation. Daycare providers, nannies and baby sitters also find the training very helpful. Emergency medical technicians, firefighters, police, ski patrol, and health care professionals attend professional level classes.

Let’s see what things you should consider before taking a CPR class. Different people attend the class for different reasons. Before you choose a class, make sure that it meets your needs. When you attend a class, state your needs and interests. It is possible to tailor the classes to meet your requirements.

First of all, you have to ask them if there is a test. There are some institutes where a test is a requirement, and you must pass it. But what if you do not pass the test? Ask them what happens in that case.

Most classes are hands-on. You may need to use some take-home materials and video information. But the whole point of the class is to learn while actually doing it. You can not really learn the ins and outs of CPR just by watching videos.

The instructors must be certified. Before you attend a course, ask them who will be your instructors and whether they are certified. Unskilled instructors will just waste your valuable time. If you visit a health services company which offers medical courses such as Wilson Medic One then you can be certain you are being trained by a health service professional.

Also ask them what instructional tools are used. The class should at least have a CPR dummy to help you learn how to perform chest compression. When you apply pressure, the dummy may flash or beep. However, this is a basic tool. Some courses use some other sophisticated tools.

If you are interested in CPR certification, you must contact people who can really help you. Hopefully the information provided in this article will help you make an informed decision and learn how to perform Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation in the proper way.

Many people want to know what CPR is and who can get the certificate. The goal of this post is to provide you with enough information about CPR certification. Before we go into details, let us know in short what CPR--Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation, really is.

The heart ceases pumping blood when there is cardiac arrest. Ventricular fibrillation causes it, and the heart quivers when it happens. CPR is a process of delivering some blood to the heart. When the heart receives blood, the whole body keeps functioning. Gradually the heart resumes its normal function—which is known as defibrillation.

Now we will look at the history of CPR. The Paris Academy of Science recommended mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in 1740. This technique was used to assist drowning victims. But the official documentation of chest compression took place more than a century later, in 1891. Although CPR was initially developed for doctors, common people later showed interest in the technique.

Now CPR certification is mainly offered to doctors, chiropractors, licensed physical therapists, nurses and dentists. Teachers, camp counsellors, lifeguards also receive the training. If you are not in any of these professions, you should learn what it is so that you can act quickly when there is an emergency.

Local hospitals, even fire departments issue the certificate. There are many places which advertise that they offer training courses to earn your first aid and CPR certificate, take a look at their website and find the course which suits you. Starting somewhere local would likely be the best fit.

The levels of certification also vary a bit. There are community level classes that focus on teaching CPR, mainly performed on older children and adults. AED training is also a part of the course. They focus on helping heart attack victims by performing electronic defibrillation. Daycare providers, nannies and baby sitters also find the training very helpful. Emergency medical technicians, firefighters, police, ski patrol, and health care professionals attend professional level classes.

Let’s see what things you should consider before taking a CPR class. Different people attend the class for different reasons. Before you choose a class, make sure that it meets your needs. When you attend a class, state your needs and interests. It is possible to tailor the classes to meet your requirements.

First of all, you have to ask them if there is a test. There are some institutes where a test is a requirement, and you must pass it. But what if you do not pass the test? Ask them what happens in that case.

Most classes are hands-on. You may need to use some take-home materials and video information. But the whole point of the class is to learn while actually doing it. You can not really learn the ins and outs of CPR just by watching videos.

The instructors must be certified. Before you attend a course, ask them who will be your instructors and whether they are certified. Unskilled instructors will just waste your valuable time. If you visit a health services company which offers medical courses such as Wilson Medic One then you can be certain you are being trained by a health service professional.

Also ask them what instructional tools are used. The class should at least have a CPR dummy to help you learn how to perform chest compression. When you apply pressure, the dummy may flash or beep. However, this is a basic tool. Some courses use some other sophisticated tools.

If you are interested in CPR certification, you must contact people who can really help you. Hopefully the information provided in this article will help you make an informed decision and learn how to perform Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation in the proper way.